Last edited by Arashit
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

6 edition of The history of Baltimore"s streetcars found in the catalog.

The history of Baltimore"s streetcars

by Michael R. Farrell

  • 278 Want to read
  • 1 Currently reading

Published by Greenberg Pub. Co. in Sykesville, Md .
Written in

    Places:
  • Maryland,
  • Baltimore
    • Subjects:
    • Street-railroads -- Maryland -- Baltimore -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      Other titlesBaltimore"s streetcars.
      StatementMichael R. Farrell ; with additional material by Herbert H. Harwood, Jr. and Andrew S. Blumberg.
      ContributionsFarrell, Michael R.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHE4491.B37 F35 1992
      The Physical Object
      Pagination312 p. :
      Number of Pages312
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1707017M
      ISBN 100897782836
      LC Control Number92008474
      OCLC/WorldCa25548091

      Baltimore, largest city in Maryland and the state’s economic center. Lying about 40 miles (65 km) northeast of Washington, D.C., it constitutes the northeastern hub of the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area. It was established in as a port for shipping tobacco and g: streetcars. , May 21 - , May J. Barry Mahool (Democrat), Mayor.. , Nov. The Johns Hopkins University accepted women graduate students.. H. L. Mencken became literary critic for Smart Set.. , July 2. Thurgood Marshall (), civil rights attorney and first African-American Supreme Court Justice, born in Baltimore.. Russian-born population of Baltimore (including Missing: streetcars.

        Because this museum provides history about public transport vehicles and its Baltimore system in the years from horsecars until , and you can touch - even ride many of the electric streetcars of the 20th century, you can be transported into what life was like before automobiles in a way that is lively and fun.5/5(52). The Battle Monument of the War of stands as in memory of the Battle of Baltimore, which inspired the poem for the lyrics to the National Anthem, The Star-Spangled Banner by Francis Scott Key. It was followed by Maryland's largest tourist destination, the National Aquarium in Baltimore, in

      Museum of streetcar/transit history located in downtown Baltimore BSM is one of the greatest secrets of Baltimore City - a small all-volunteer museum dedicated to the history of street railways and transit in Baltimore (with representative operating streetcars also from Philadelphia). Numerous vintage cars operate at BSM from early 20th Century wooden open and closed streetcars to more modern Location: Falls Rd, Baltimore, , MD.   The streetcar was the first important improvement over the omnibus. The first streetcars were also pulled by horses, but the streetcars rolled along special steel rails that were placed in the middle of the roadway instead of traveling along regular : Mary Bellis.


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The history of Baltimore"s streetcars by Michael R. Farrell Download PDF EPUB FB2

Handsomely done history of Baltimore's streetcars, from the horse-drawn cars of to the light rail renaissance of The author details the colorful and fascinating story of Baltimore's street railways, covering the companies and car lines, promoters and politicians, the people who worked the cars, and the equipment that made it all work.5/5(1).

About the Author. The Baltimore Streetcar Museum is a nonprofit facility dedicated to the preservation of Baltimore's public transit history, especially from the street-railway era.

Gary Helton lives and works in Bel Air, Maryland, where he is the manager of public radio station WHFC-FM/5(7). Get this from a library.

The history of Baltimore's streetcars. [Michael R Farrell; Herbert H Harwood; Andrew S Blumberg] -- History of Baltimore's streetcars from to The romance of the streetcar is a strong presence in many of the Images of America books of urban history.

Baltimore's mass transit system was unique for many reasons in addition to its diversity. As early asBaltimore established by ordinance a wide track gauge of 5 feet inches, which became known as the "Baltimore Gauge".Reviews: 7. In the s, Baltimore'sresidents had few options when it came to getting around town.

Before the decade's end, however, the omnibus--an urban version of the stagecoach--emerged as. The book became the standard reference work on the long history of the city's streetcar heritage, which began with horsecars plodding the JTC streets in and ended in   A streetcar on the Guilford Avenue elevated in Baltimore, which ran along Guilford Avenue from Chase Street to just north of Lexington Street from to Image by Maryland Transit Administration.

A story, that is not in the book, but was a favorite of the late James A. Hartzell, Baltimore Sun artist and creator of the Oriole Bird mascot, concerns the Union Avenue Jerkwater, the No. 46, that. Baltimore can lay claim to a number of firsts in the history of the streetcar.

On Aug the first commercially operated electric streetcar in America began operation in Baltimore. Leo Daft, an engineer from England, converted the Baltimore to Hampden Line from horse-drawn cars to electricity, via his unique third rail system, using the current from that third rail as the power source.

Prior to the turn of the century, streetcars were built almost exclusively for either summer or winter service, father than year-round operation. is representative of the former type. Part of an order of 75 cars, it was constructed by the Brownell Car Company of St.

Louis, Missouri, for the Baltimore Traction Company. Baltimore became the first city in the United States to get a commercially operated electric streetcar on Aug.

10, According to the Maryland Historical Society. After Frank J. Sprague developed an electric streetcar powered by an overhead wire for Richmond, Virginia, Baltimore adopted the new system and in opened the first elevated electric line in the U.S.April Baltimore Water Company formed (chartered ).March 3-Aug.

Robert Smith () of Baltimore served as U.S. Attorney General. Construction started for Basilica of the Assumption, America's first Roman Catholic ed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, main section completed Maximilien Godefroy designed first Gothic Revival structure in.

Incredible series of photos from showing Baltimore streetcars across the city. Published by the president of the United Railways & Electric Company.

Elevated Streetcar of Baltimore. The Baltimore Streetcar Museum on Falls Road inthe year the museum opened. (Richard Stacks, Baltimore Sun files, ) There are a lot of civic treasures we take for granted in Baltimore, one of which is the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, whose collection of vintage streetcars can be seen Sunday afternoons swaying down its Falls Road trackage with clanging bells and happy riders.

The author describes aspects of Baltimore's history in the first decades of the 20th century, details the team's year-by-year performance, explores front-office and management dynamics and traces the shaping of the Negro Leagues. 26 City of Baltimore Comprehensive Master Plan The History of Baltimore 27 to – The Beginning There was nothing unusual in when several wealthy Marylanders pushed through the State Leg-islature a town charter for Baltimore.

Town charters were. Herbert H. Harwood here gives us a glorious picture of Baltimore in the heyday of the streetcar, combining the story of lines and equipment with a nostalgic view of Baltimore when so many of her people relied on street railways.

From the late s through World War II, streetcars transported Baltimore's population to and from work, play, and just about everything else. The demise of the Baltimore streetcar took place between the years of andhastened by National City Lines ' acquisition, which said that buses offered lower maintenance and had greater flexibility in traffic.

With its rails demolished, Baltimore was no longer a streetcar city. The Baltimore Streetcar Museum traces its roots back almost 90 years, well before the present-day museum was even a glimmer in the eyes of its founders. Inthe United Railways and Electric Company of Baltimore (a forerunner to today’s Maryland Transit Administration), staged what came to be known as “The Fair of the Electric Pony.”.

The Avenue in Hampden is filled with colorful shops and restaurants. Once a 19th-century blue-collar mill town that has evolved into the epicenter of hipster Baltimore kitsch, Hampden’s main drag, aka “The Avenue,” is a great place to grab a bite, share a beer, check out. Here is a beautiful series of photos that we found on Flickr showing the city's old streetcars.

The one below was taken just a few weeks before President Kennedy would be shot. Baltimore Transit - E. Fayette east of Liberty Street November 2, Baltimore transit in Walbrook Baltimore.

This is a fascinating old article that we came across in The Baltimore Sun. It was printed on July 26th, and we just have to share it with you.